Global experience starts with a ‘YES!’

When I received an email last April about applications for the Young Economic Summit program, there was no question I wanted my students to participate. I’ll be honest – they had me at “Free trip to Germany.” I didn’t really think through the drawbacks, like planning for a sub (for a week!), preparing for the…

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Durban, South Africa

In Summer 2010, I participated in an Economics International trip to South Africa, where I spent two weeks learning about the economy and the public education system. It was fun to watch students learn many of the same economics lessons, from the trade game below to the monetary equation of exchange. The teacher below, from…

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What’s included in a ‘patriotic’ education?

To many Americans, I’m sure Trump’s “1776 Project” to create pro-American history curriculum seems reasonable. After all, why wouldn’t you teach kids to love the country they live in?  Won’t that instill loyalty and good citizenship down the road? Don’t we need loyalty and good citizenship to ensure our national security? And isn’t it preferable…

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What our students can learn from the 2020 tech overload

It’s easy to get frustrated about distance learning. Who doesn’t hate it?  Teachers are overwhelmed by balancing in-person and online instruction, modifying lessons, cramming content into less time and constantly being asked to learn new tools — and we also miss the genuine, fun interactions and a-ha moments that actually make our jobs enjoyable. Students…

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Five tips to make Zoom your friend. Really.

Time to take a deep breath. Yes, we are doing this.  We are teaching online/blended/virtual/hybrid/whateveryoucallit and a little bit face-to-face, and we’re all feeling a little numb by now.  We’re also starting to run into those nagging “how do I make this work?” questions that we weren’t thinking of during our two hours of tech…

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